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Thursday, January 29, 2004

If you have an interest in Heavyhands exercise, whether you've been an active Heavyhander for years or are a brand new fan of the system - Please join this BLOG. Simply send an e-mail request to heavyhands@panaerobics.com
K.B.
Lion Sports
Question: Pulse With A Pair Of Ten Pounders

I found that walking without handweights , my pulse only gets up to
94, with a pair of 5 pounders, it is 104 range. When I use a pair
of 10 pounders; I get in the 125 range.

Answer: I would need more information to give you a great answer, but I can provide somewhat of a response for now. What target pulse do you want to generate with each bout of Heavyhands exercise? By mixing up amount of weight pumped, range of motion of the pump, and frequency of the movement you should be able to maintain a good training heart rate. Sometimes with the heavier weights a person's strength and power might limit them so that they cannot move the weight through a range of motion or frequency (or length of time) to generate a training heart rate. This does not seem to be your case.

To generate a higher heart rate (if that is your goal) with 5 pounders, simply increase the range of motion: pump higher, pump with reaches to the sides or low, add dips and squats as you walk or pump/walk at a higher frequency per minute. Increasing in these areas may be possible for a minute or two and your heart rate or muscle fatigue may require you to adjust to a more limited range of motion or slower frequency.

Mixing up high intensity work with lower intensity work is a wonderful interval training system.

If you would like to join our BLOG where you can ask Dr. Schwartz questions like this one, please request an invitation at Heavyhands@panaerobics.com

K.B.
Lion Sports
Marketing


Saturday, January 17, 2004

Dr. Schwartz has been working hard on a system that can be used while traveling. In fact he has done 6 years' research on that system and is in the process of writing a powerful book on the topic : ISO tonometircs. Look for the website to be launched soon, the book coming out right afterward.
For travel you may want to bring somethig lighter, like 3# heavyhands and move at a higher frequency or greater range of motions adding flexes, leans, dips and squats to your in-place movement.
Also, to alleviate the shoulder fatigue while walking you may want to vary the pump with flings, double ski poling, swing 'n sway and other movements that keep the heartrate up while giving the shoulders a break. HEAVYHAND- The Ultimate Exercise can be found on amamzon.com and has plenty of ideas for alternative moves. The more versatile your collection of movement patterns the more you engage trunk and other muscles not commonly used in your heavyhands walking routine.
K.B.

Wednesday, January 14, 2004


Sunday, January 11, 2004

Hello,

I love heavyhands, especially the actual 'heavyhands' dumbell because it feels so much more comfortable than regular dumbells.

I seem to be able to use a 3# weight without much fatigueing pumping it right up to as high as I can as I walk for 2 approx 20 minute walks per day. I used a 5# weight for my walk and my shoulders got weary. Then, I found that these muscles were tired even when I wanted back to the 3# weight.

What I am wondering is that in order to build the cardiovascular ability or strength-endurance, should I stay with the 3# for a long time, or should I use a 5# occassionally and then take a couple days off. It seems that if I use the 3# I don't need days off, but when I use a higher weight, I will need to take days off to recover.

After doing the pump and walk with the 3# I tried the 5#... and then I tried using my 3# inside the house using an aerobic 'step' and stepping up onto the step using pump and step. This seemed very exhaustive and my breathing went up much higher than when I do regular pump and walk. I am thinking maybe I need to do 1# or 2# for the step and pump. I will say I think this is a phenomenal excercise.... step and pump/swing.

Finally, I do travel a lot. I can see bringing light heavyhands with me on a trip, definitely nothing over 5# each. I like the idea of never leaving the hotel room, but rather turning on the radio and working out that way. If anyone has any ideas relative to how to tote around a step or convert a piece of luggage into a step so that I can do the step and pump on the road, I would appreciate it. Some ultratough computer case that is 8# tall (basically a toolbox) would be ideal in my opinion..... don't know of luggage that tough that they can be used to step on.

Monday, January 05, 2004

Responses to the questions posed by N.F. from Len Schwartz

N.F.: Would you say your originally rather heterodox ideas have now entered the mainstream in exercise physiology circles, or are there still doubters?

L.S. My guess is that the infiltration is both spotty and iffy! It appears that
this 'heterodoxy' has been either bypassed or-over a short time frame-adopted as the only way
to go. This feast or famine quality may have to do with the fact that
Longstrength hasn't really been presented to the public so that men and women would
get involved. Same applies in physiologic circles. It appears that the folks at
the University of Pittsburgh are eager to reengage Heavyhands (Panaerobics-Longstrength) research. There are many interesting pockets of doubt, just as in all the basic areas of fitness/exercise research, but
that's where the fun lies!

N.F. Why was your (amazing) combined VO2 max of ~ 80 at age 57 estimated?

L.S. As I recall, we had measured my 02 pulse at various levels of continuous
intensity earlier. That made it feasable for me to estimate V02s by merely pulse
counting. With later direct measurements (many) this level was reaffirmed. I
remember one level of 70 ml/kilo/min-1 was directly measured at a pulse of
less than 120/bpm! A famous U.S. physiologist, looking at my findings was
prepared to say that was indeed a most high test! Actually, given the liklihood of
the penetrance of genetic and technical issues I make much less fuss about
V02's. We do what we can, period! More important, I think are those submaximal
V02s which is where the work of exercise is accomplished!

N.F. What has been your personal experience with respect to VO2 Max decline in your 60s and 70s

L.S. Surprisingly little, if any decline. A couple of years ago I did walk 'n'
pump treadmill test that appeared to be as high or higher than that direct test.
The literature indicates that there is a fall off in performance among
aging, regular, aerobic type athletes. I do believe that eventually Longstrength
type athletes will record some of the highest submaximal performances. These
could well be accomplished by athletes who handle heavy weights while doing
comparatively many repetitions (perhaps a thousand or more), within the aerobic
sphere. The work of Pavel Tsatsuline at Dragondoor is fascinating in this
respect.

N.F. What about your % BF and MHR/RP?

L.S. Let's talk about this one!
perhaps 3-5 at my petite 130lbs! Resting pulse 40-50.

N.F. How recent is the great looking colour photo on the HH website?

L.S. Pretty recent, within 5 years.

Sunday, January 04, 2004

Hello to N.F.
What a story! It's been reported again and again that heavyhanders who train for running by walking and pumping often lower times while avoiding knee injury (or recuperating). The addition of trunk and weighted arms can create a total workload that simply cannot be generated leg alone by most athletes. With the entire musculature becoming better at aerobic work, the task of merely carrying the upper body around while running becomes easier.
Please take a look at www.panaerobics.com and add any comments you'd like. I forwarded the questions to Len and we'll post the answers in a day or so.
K.B.
Lion Sports

Thursday, January 01, 2004

Hello, and Happy New Year to all

I am a retired pathologist living in Cape Town, South Africa

Len Schwartz has been an inspirational eminence in my life since 1984 when I was 38 years old. A moderately good but rather heavily built recreational runner (10k in 34:15; marathon 2:50; 170+lbs at 5’10)

I happened upon the first HH book in a local bookstore in Upstate NY and the B&W photos of the 57 year old were an epiphany. That was the kind of body I wanted to have

The exercise physiology expounded seemed plausible.

I bought and experimented with a selection of generic dumbbells 1-15 lbs. (My XXL handsize was too large even for the large patented HH handweights). Not surprising – I have size 13 EEEE feet – thank God for New Balance.

And quickly made great improvements in upper body endurance/strength, as promised.

Before I could test whether the enhanced muscularity of upper body was detrimental to my running, I tore a meniscus in my knee playing racquetball. This was the early days of arthroscopic surgery. I couldn’t run for over 12 years without knee pain. But I kept up religiously with HH walking medleys with lots of DSP in particular

I,too, rarely ever saw anyone else doing it right!

At age 50 I gingerly started running again as my knee pain seemed under control and entered some 5ks
Interestingly, my age adjusted running times were several notches higher than almost a decade and a half earlier. I was matching and often easily beating my erstwhile nemeses who had continued running and training hard all the while.

Now retired, I have recently taken up competitive racewalking, a very challenging sport, but one far more suited to my (panaerobically conditioned) physiognomy. Whereas I was an 84% level 53 year old runner (national class), I am a 90% level racewalker at 57 (3k in 14:00 in judged competition - world class for age)

Clearly, quite consistent intense training with HH over 15 years has in my case been crucial in mitigating (?halving) the usual or expected age related decline in aerobic capacity.

Aerobically trained upper extremities are a definite advantage in RW (as predicted by LS in his walking book)

A few questions for LS (I have many):

Would you say your originally rather heterodox ideas have now entered the mainstream in exercise physiology circles, or are there still doubters?

Why was your (amazing) combined VO2 max of ~ 80 at age 57 estimated?

What has been your personal experience with respect to VO2 Max decline in your 60s and 70s

What about your % BF and MHR/RP?

How recent is the great looking colour photo on the HH website?

NF




Hello, and Happy New Year to all

I am a retired pathologist living in Cape Town, South Africa

Len Schwartz has been an inspirational eminence in my life since 1984 when I was 38 years old. A moderately good but rather heavily built recreational runner (10k in 34:15; marathon 2:50; 170+lbs at 5’10)

I happened upon the first HH book in a local bookstore in Upstate NY and the B&W photos of the 57 year old were an epiphany. That was the kind of body I wanted to have

The exercise physiology expounded seemed plausible.

I bought and experimented with a selection of generic dumbbells 1-15 lbs. (My XXL handsize was too large even for the large patented HH handweights). Not surprising – I have size 13 EEEE feet – thank God for New Balance.

And quickly made great improvements in upper body endurance/strength, as promised.

Before I could test whether the enhanced muscularity of upper body was detrimental to my running, I tore a meniscus in my knee playing racquetball. This was the early days of arthroscopic surgery. I couldn’t run for over 12 years without knee pain. But I kept up religiously with HH walking medleys with lots of DSP in particular

I,too, rarely ever saw anyone else doing it right!

At age 50 I gingerly started running again as my knee pain seemed under control and entered some 5ks
Interestingly, my age adjusted running times were several notches higher than almost a decade and a half earlier. I was matching and often easily beating my erstwhile nemeses who had continued running and training hard all the while.

Now retired, I have recently taken up competitive racewalking, a very challenging sport, but one far more suited to my (panaerobically conditioned) physiognomy. Whereas I was an 84% level 53 year old runner (national class), I am a 90% level racewalker at 57 (3k in 14:00 in judged competition - world class for age)

Clearly, quite consistent intense training with HH over 15 years has in my case been crucial in mitigating (?halving) the usual or expected age related decline in aerobic capacity.

Aerobically trained upper extremities are a definite advantage in RW (as predicted by LS in his walking book)

A few questions for LS (I have many):

Would you say your originally rather heterodox ideas have now entered the mainstream in exercise physiology circles, or are there still doubters?

Why was your (amazing) combined VO2 max of ~ 80 at age 57 estimated?

What has been your personal experience with respect to VO2 Max decline in your 60s and 70s

What about your % BF and MHR/RP?

How recent is the great looking colour photo on the HH website?

NF




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